Garden update: June 2019

How did it get to be June?

Wow, my garden update feels like one of those cooking shows where they put the uncooked dish in the oven and a moment later pull out the finished dish! 

I assure you, it was nothing like that. First of all, many of my seedlings keeled over when the power went out for days and the temp inside my house was down in the 40s. No light table, no bottom heat, no ambient heat. It was sad. I had to start over with almost everything. Amazingly, my tomatoes made it through snowmageddon, but one variety, a cherry tomato called Cherriette, lagged well behind the others. I thought they would never grow up. (They did.)

I live in the woods and there is no open space that gets full sun all or most of the day. This is a good news/bad news situation. And really the only bad news is providing enough sun to the veggies that demand it. I am trying lots of plants in pots this year and moving them around to find the best spot. 

So–do you think I have a pot problem?

Here’s what did well:

  • Tomatoes
  • Texas Sage
  • Eggplant
  • Squash
  • Cucumbers (though I lost a couple after transplanting)
  • Artemesia (but sooooooo slow to start–but, first time growing from seed!)
  • Yarrow (also slow)
  • Verbascum (first time!)
  • Hyssop (first time!)
  • Asters

I have a couple of these:

  • Bok Choi
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Thai Basil
  • Melons
  • Some miscellaneous flowers including bachelor buttons and Chinese forget-me-nots

#Fail

  • Basil
  • Jerusalem Sage (first time)

Wild success with no help from me:

  • Tulsi Basil
  • Mint 
  • Strawberries (I can’t believe it)

A couple of my bell peppers from last year may be coming back–they are sprouting new leaves. Fingers crossed. 

Some plants will be transplanted into bigger pots or grow bags. I bought some 7- and 10-gallon grow pots to try this year. 

You might notice some other things in the photos that are definitely not veggies. Last year I bought seedlings from the Thurston County Conversation District. I could not dig holes fast enough so some plants went in pots. They all did well and in some cases outperformed their fellow plants that are in the ground. 

How’s your garden this year? 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *